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May is the Stroke Awareness Month

Sudhir Mathuria HEALTHLIFE 360 713-771-2900

Sudhir Mathuria
HEALTHLIFE 360
713-771-2900

May marks National Stroke Awareness Month, and this year the National Stroke Association is turning the spotlight on the 10 modifiable risk factors that account for 90% of strokes globally. Hypertension remains the single most important modifiable risk factor, accounting for nearly 48% of strokes. With eight in 10 people experiencing their first stroke having hypertension, getting your blood pressure checked is an important first step in controlling your stroke risk.

Stroke Facts
• Stroke is the fifth leading cause of death in the United States, killing about 140,000 Americans each year—that’s 1 of every 20 deaths.1
• A stroke, sometimes called a brain attack, occurs when a clot blocks the blood supply to the brain or when a blood vessel in the brain bursts.
• Someone in the United States has a stroke every 40 seconds
• Every year, about 795,000 people in the United States have a stroke. About 610,000 of these are first or new strokes; 185,000 are recurrent strokes.
• Stroke is an important cause of disability. Stroke reduces mobility in more than half of stroke survivors age 65 and over.2
• Stroke costs the nation $34 billion annually, including the cost of health care services, medications, and lost productivity.2
• You can’t control some stroke risk factors, like heredity, age, gender, and ethnicity. Some medical conditions—including high blood pressure, high cholesterol, heart disease, diabetes, overweight or obesity, and previous stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA)—can also raise your stroke risk. Avoiding smoking and drinking too much alcohol, eating a balanced diet, and getting exercise are all choices you can make to reduce your risk.
Common Stroke Warning Signs and Symptoms
• Sudden numbness or weakness of the face, arm, or leg—especially on one side of the body.
• Sudden confusion, trouble speaking or understanding.
• Sudden trouble seeing in one or both eyes.
• Sudden trouble walking, dizziness, loss of balance or coordination.
• Sudden severe headache with no known cause.
You can help prevent stroke by making healthy lifestyle choices.
• Healthy Diet
• Eating foods low in saturated fats, trans fat, and cholesterol and high in fiber can help prevent high cholesterol. Limiting salt (sodium) in your diet can also lower your blood pressure. High cholesterol and high blood pressure increase your chances of having a stroke.
• For more information on healthy diet and nutrition, see CDC’s Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity Program website.
• Healthy Weight
• Being overweight or obese increases your risk for stroke. To determine whether your weight is in a healthy range, doctors often calculate your body mass index (BMI).
• Physical Activity
• Physical activity can help you stay at a healthy weight and lower your cholesterol and blood pressure levels. For adults, the Surgeon General recommends 2 hours and 30 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic physical activity, such as a brisk walk, each week. Children and teens should get 1 hour of physical activity every day.
• For more information, see CDC’s Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity website.
• No Smoking
• Cigarette smoking greatly increases your chances of having a stroke. If you don’t smoke, don’t start. If you do smoke, quitting will lower your risk for stroke. Your doctor can suggest ways to help you quit.
• For more information about tobacco use and quitting, see CDC’s Smoking & Tobacco Use website.
• Limited or No Alcohol
The need for public awareness surrounding stroke prevention and awareness has never been greater. Despite being a leading cause of adult long-term disability, and the fifth leading cause of death, less than one in five Americans can correctly classify all five stroke symptoms. The time to take action is now. This May, during National Stroke Awareness month, get to know your stroke risk factors and learn to better identify the signs and symptoms of stroke. The life you save just might be your own.
To choose Medicare or Long Term Care plan contact Sudhir Mathuria, HEALTHLIFE 360, Ph: 713-771-2900


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